Roses – Phylogeny and diversity

rosa blanda

The genus Rosa comprises more than 100 species mostly distributed in temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. Of these hundreds of species only approximately 7-8 species are commonly used in the horticultural trade. Despite the obvious interest for germplasm development and plant improvement of better understanding phylogenetic relationships in roses, very few studies have been undertaken to examine relationships within this morphologically and reproductively complex genus. Using molecular markers (sequences from chloroplast and nuclear genes) we are beginning to have a better understanding of genealogical relationship in roses. By providing horticulturists with an idea of relationships within Rosa, we can help them make guided choices of new species to include in their crossing experiments and research into species more resistant to cold and diseases. Our research on roses, also includes a diversity study of two rare and endangered species in Québec. These studies are being undertaken in collaboration with Walter H. Lewis (Washington University) and Barbara Ertter (Berkeley).

  • Marjorie Mercure, Hybridization between an escaped and a native rose species: Impact on the genetic and morphological integrity of Rosa blanda
  • Simon Joly, Systématique et hybridation chez les espèces du complexe Rosa carolinaR. virginiana en Amérique du Nord
  • Julian R. Starr, Évolution et phylogénie du genre Rosa

rosa blanda

+ Centre sur la biodiversité